Redirection occurs at any time when the user attempts to load a page for a particular URL but is sent to a site with a slightly different address. There are many reasons why redirections could be considered: 

  1. The original site has been moved and you want to send users to the latest location 
  2. You want to track clicks and log pages, reference users to your site/site 
  3.  You want to maintain multiple domains 
  4.  You want to protect the information you are sending and receiving by changing from http to https 
  5.  However, in some cases, there may be unnecessary redirects on your site, including: 
  6.  Use the device-specific version of your website to redirect mobile users from example.com to m.example.com/home 
  7. Inconsistent hyperlinks on your website mixing URLs with and without the www prefix 

In the worst case, the redirection will trigger an additional http request: response cycle, delay page rendering. In the worst case, redirection can result in multiple round-trip request-response cycles, including but not limited to DNS lookups, TCP handshake, and TLS negotiation. 

Either way, redirection increases the time it takes for the site to process and should minimize its use to optimize page performance. However, if your site needs redirection, you should be careful to deploy it so that users see as little latency as possible. 

The round-trip time (RTT) is the time it takes for the client to send a request and the server to send a response over the network, excluding the time it takes for data transfer. That is, it includes the round-trip time on the line, but does not include the time the transfer bytes are fully downloaded (hence irrelevant bandwidth). 

 Unlike RTTS, less than 1 millisecond on the LAN and more than 1 second at worst, for example, the modem connects to a service hosted on a different continent than the user. For small download file sizes, such as search result pages, it is the main factor that causes “fast” latency connections (broadband). 

Therefore, an important strategy for accelerating the performance of the website is to minimize the number of round-trip trips that need to be made. Since most round-trip trips include http requests and responses, minimize the number of requests the customer needs to make and parallelize as much as possible. 

Sometimes your app needs to redirect the browser from one URL to another. There are several reasons for Web application problem redirection to indicate the new location of the asset that has been moved. 

Track clicks and impressions, and record reference pages to maintain multiple domains, allow “easy to use” or “vanity” domains and URLs, and capture misspelled or misspelled URLs. 

Connect between different parts of the website or app, different country code top-level domains, different protocols (http to https), different security policies (such as unauthenticated and authenticated pages). 

Add the final slash to the URL directory name, making it’s content accessible to the browser. 

Whatever the reason, redirection triggers an extra http request-response loop and increases reincarnation delay. Redirects are the resources needed to minimize the number of redirects from versions of the application, especially to launch the home page. 

The best way to do this is to limit the use of redirection to situations where technically absolutely necessary and to find other solutions that are not. 

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